I am a runner

(On February 14th, Dillan and his dad, Randy, ran a half-marathon relay in the LA Marathon. Here are some of their thoughts about it…)

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Dillan:

It’s a huge task to run a marathon. Not a huge task for someone like me, but a mighty task for any person. I did it alongside so many people banded together by the mighty task. We all ran and we all became no one thing. I was not autistic running, I was only running. I was among thousands of people like me, not because they had some neurological problem, but because they were doing a simple, normal thing together. Any other time, I am a standout. I have noises. I do weird stuff with my hands. You know that because you are reading this blog by the amazing kid with autism who actually can have thoughts too. But in the marathon, I was only a runner like those others, and I crushed it!

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Dad:

So the LA marathon finally came and went.  The weather turned out to be perfect and not too hot as they were all projecting.  Dillan was calm and collected the whole morning and seemed really ready to run.  We started our half of the marathon after our friends came in with a great time in under 2 hours.  We congratulated them, took some pictures, and then headed off to join the pack for the second half.  Dillan was amped up and went out hard.  I had to keep telling him to relax and pace himself.  We stopped to walk only for each water station to make sure we stayed hydrated.  Dillan kept a very steady pace and didn’t waver a bit until maybe the last mile.  He started losing focus and tried to walk, but I would not have it.  I encouraged him to keep going as the finish line was in our sights.  We ended up crossing the finish line arm in arm.  When it was over, the official time clock showed 3:43 for the whole marathon.  My Garmin showed we did 13.1 miles in 1:46.5 at an 8:13 average pace.  That is by far the fastest recorded time for any distance over 10k for Dillan (and myself for that matter).  I was so proud of him and he was even smiling right after crossing the finish line.

(Chocolate milk is the best “recovery drink” and Dillan loves it!)

 

 

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Cross Country Banquet

Editor’s note:  Being a part of the cross country and track team has been a highlight of Dillan’s high school experience.  Dillan received a special recognition at the end-of-season banquet and would like to share this in order to show that it is possible to be an equal and valuable member of a class or team.  We thank his incredible coaches and teammates for a wonderful season, and for their ability to see beyond the deceiving exterior that autism can present.

Coach Nance presented this award (we were all very moved by her touching words):

“This award, Most Inspirational, goes to truly one of the most inspirational runners I’ve ever coached.  Their attitude and smile convey more than words can express about how much they enjoy running and being on the team.  They never miss a school practice or complain that it is too hot, they show up on Saturday mornings whenever possible to be right up there running with the pack, and are always ready to go.  What’s most inspirational about this runner is the attitude that consistently shouts, “ALWAYS A GOOD DAY WHEN I GET TO RUN.”  Some may think this runner has a disability, but that is not the case.  This runner has been given a gift; an ABILITY!  An ability to feel what most will never, an ability to remain positive and confident, the ability to listen, observe and not judge.  The ability to speak from the heart with wise intent, the ability to be a true runner, and the ability to inspire with their perseverance and determination to be understood and seen!  The Most Inspirational is…”

Dillan’s acceptance speech:

“Being part of a team of dedicated runners only makes one better.  This season every run I have done has been hard, but not in a bad way.  Wanting a faster pace and time is a goal each of us works to achieve.  In my early days of running I was often alone.  Running was a way for me to get my body in a calm quiet place.  The way I run now almost seems like a dream.  Now I run for myself, not just for the autistic me, but for the runner in me.  In other words, I enjoy it to the point of doing nothing else sometimes.  I so understand that urge to always want to get to the top of that hill or to the end of that mile.  And to be able to do that with a team that also runs with similar hopes and dreams is what I always wanted. Now, I look forward to many more long runs out there.  Go Canoga and thank you!”

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Talking to Debbie during XC meet

Cross Country Meet

Written 10/3/14

The only thing that helps me calm my body is running.  I really need it like air.  To be a part of a really amazing group of people which also have running in their hearts is like nothing I have felt before.  So a few days ago I ran in the first cross country meet.  That day I easily thought about not running, but then I realized that I had the opportunity to just try.  Having the practice and support from the other members of my team behind me motivated me to try.  In some especially strange way, their support allowed me to dare myself.

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